Recent Posts

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91
Steel Detailing / Re: AISC Standardised Structural Connections Manual
« Last post by lamensterms on June 23, 2016, 02:18:19 AM »
Thanks for the reply guys.

The only other clue I was able to find online was a reference made in a "Association of Consulting Structural Engineers Victoria" General Notes PDF.  It seems they are referring to the Australian Institute of Steel Construction manual, as you mentioned WAI.

Thanks a lot for the info on the design guides.  I've been meaning to get my hands on a copy of the Australian steel detailers' handbook (http://steel.org.au/bookshop/australian-steel-detailers-handbook/), but was holding off... I was under the impression that the AISD were updating and republishing it.  Not sure if that is still happening, the AISD website is down at the moment, so not sure if they're still around.
92
Steel Detailing / Re: AISC Standardised Structural Connections Manual
« Last post by wai on June 21, 2016, 07:15:30 AM »
A few questions:

What is the "AISC Standardised Structural Connections Manual"?

Is that the accurate title of the document?

Is it right for an Australian engineer to be referencing American standards?

Is there an Australian equivalent?

Ok, AISC (Australian Institute of Steel Construction) used to pit out a document with that name. I do not believe that that particular document is now available.

If you go to http://www.steel.org.au, and pick the Bookshop button, you will see the new publications covering what you are looking for.

The publications are:

Handbook 1: Design of structural steel connections. Background and theory
Design Guide 1: Bolting in structural steel connections
Design Guide 2: Welding in structural steel connections
Design Guide 3: Web side plate connections
Design Guide 4: Flexible end plate connections
Design Guide 5: Angle cleat connections
Design Guide 6: Seated connections
Design Guide 7: Pinned base plate connections for columns

The list goes on, and you can buy sets for less than them individually.

You might want to explore these. They contain a lot more information than the previous Standardized Structural Connections that were essentially for bolted connections. Of course, these are more expensive but depending on what you are doing, you might not need the full set.

On referencing the American standards, there is no issue as long as they are the same or better. The thing is that standards bodies around the world share information and so in many cases the standards are essentially identical. Any engineer should be able to work in any set of units. I may have an advantage in that when I was getting my engineering qualification, we were instructed in both Imperial and Metric, and we were examined in both - could not pick one set of units only :)
93
General Discussion / Re: Welcome to new draftsperson.net forums
« Last post by JimDang on June 19, 2016, 04:48:58 AM »
Thanks Allan for recovering our forum!! All the best to you!!
94
AutoCAD / DWG Properties in Directory Opus Columns
« Last post by lamensterms on June 18, 2016, 02:29:20 AM »
Hi,

I've been investigating the possibilities of getting DWG properties to display in Windows Explorer columns (and Directory Opus Explorer Replacement), which has led me to... http://jtbworld.com/dwg-columns-for-explorer#about

Which works great for Windows Explorer. Unfortunately it is not compatible with Directory Opus. I have been in-touch with JTB and they have advised me that it could be possible to update their program to include compatibility with DOpus, but have asked that I cover any development costs.

So... a couple of questions:

1. Are there any other Directory Opus users out there who would be interested in having support for DWG properties within DOpus columns - and help spread the financial load of the developer?

2. Are there any other options available for getting DWG properties into Windows (and other) Explorer? I have done quite a bit of searching and have not come up with much (other than the JTB program).

Thanks a lot for any help.
95
AutoCAD Civil 3D / Don't used Civil 3D without a decent drawing template!
« Last post by ALLAN on June 13, 2016, 10:54:16 PM »
Rule number 1: Don't use Civil 3D without a decent drawing template. Many first time Civil 3D users in Australia find it a hard program to use, as it doesn't produce easily the stuff the industry expects on civil drawings. Do your self a favour and use these templates from an Australian based company, civil survey solutions:

http://www.civilsurveysolutions.com.au/index.php/support-and-services/civil-3d-resource-materials

Using a decent "Australian Standard" template saved my life in the early years of Autodesk Civil 3D learning.
96
There are heaps of drafting projects for freelance CAD operators at: freelancer.com

I have used this site to get hand drawings CAD drafted in AutoCAD, there are some great operators on this website. There is also a very vibrant marketplace for logo contests, which I have used numerous times, with great success.
97
Civil Drafting / Don't use Civil 3D without a decent drawing template
« Last post by ALLAN on June 13, 2016, 07:05:36 AM »
Rule number 1: Don't use Civil 3D without a decent drawing template. Many first time Civil 3D users in Australia find it a hard program to use, as it doesn't produce easily the stuff the industry expects on civil drawings. Do your self a favour and use these templates from an Australian based company, civil survey solutions:

http://www.civilsurveysolutions.com.au/index.php/support-and-services/civil-3d-resource-materials

Using a decent "Australian Standard" template saved my life in the early years of Autodesk Civil 3D learning.
98
Threshold ramps, step ramps, ramps, what is the difference? Australian standard AS 1428.1 defines what they are. In basic form they are:

Threshold ramp: Maximum 35mm high, 280mm long and a grade of 1:8

Step ramp: Maximum 190mm high, 1900mm long and a grade of 1:10

Ramps: a height above 190mm with a maximum grade of 1:14. Maximum 9000mm long between landings.

Unimod has publish a handy ready reckoner with more details. It is attached to this post below
99
General Discussion / Recognizing parts in a manual drafting set.
« Last post by Pappa Piccolino on June 09, 2016, 11:54:39 AM »
Hi everyone.

This question may be more for old school manual drafters.

I recently acquired a Wild Heerbrugg drafting set, RZ31. There's a couple of pieces in there and I'm not sure what they do. I have attached a photo.

One part is a black metal tube, ribbed except at the ends, where it is open and also has small slits.

The other is a circular metal ring with 3 small screws and a glass or acrylic see through centre.

Any help would be appreciated.

Thank you.
100
About my company / Re: New website . Custom Home Designs. Stock Garages
« Last post by ALLAN on May 20, 2016, 02:06:07 AM »
All the best with your business Marcy. Be sure to post a couple of cool things to the Revit and Architectural parts of this forum.
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